Here are the crowds at Iowa Hawkeyes home games at Kinnick Stadium through the years.

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Year       Total         Avg.       Total       Avg.

1934   84,000    28,000   195,500  24,438

1935   116,000  23,200   193,000  24,125

1936   64,000   16,000   186,200  23,275

1938   64,000   16,000   152,000  19,000

1939   129,500  32,375   234,500  29,313

1940   106,700  26,675   262,730  32,837

1941   88,200   29,400   199,539  24,942

1942   110,400  15,771   179,043  17,904

1943   41,200   10,300   106,849  12,831

1944   42,200   10,550   111,056  13,882

1945   64,100   16,025   212,502  23,611

1946   197,811  39,562   384,191  42,688

1947   187,844  46,961   488,752  54,306

1948   212,708  42,542   356,542  39,616

1949   218,021  43,604   356,352  39,594

1950   222,921  44,584   456,473  50,719

1951   157,883  39,471   392,563  43,618

1952   181,164  45,291   349,467  38,829

1953   211,109  42,222   406,570  45,174

1954   245,421  49,084   491,608  54,623

1955   201,072  50,268   545,025  60,558

1956   306,478  51,079   534,550  53,455

1957   203,709  50,927   500,856  55,651

1958   329,673  54,912   630,262  63,026

1959   279,400  55,880   518,894  57,655

1960   264,100  52,820   506,590  56,288

1961   290,250  58,050   516,360  57,373

1962   281,216  56,212   478,828  53,203

1963   230,200  57,550   463,096  57,887

1964   266,391  53,278   483,697  53,744

1965   263,700  52,740   513,198  51,319

1966   278,628  46,438   498,688  49,869

1967   241,993  48,399   506,550  50,655

1968   294,126  49,021   473,811  47,381

1969   301,287  50,218   504,083  50,408

1970   248,643  49,728   490,438  49,043

1971   233,150  46,630   569,876  51,807

1972   220,833  44,166   537,504  48,864

1973   217,846  43,569   616,884  56,080

1974   291,600  48,600   571,185  51,926

1975   320,690  53,448   531,319  48,302

1976   267,327  53,465   614,382  55,853

1977   377,410  53,916   651,869  59,261

1978   319,289  53,214   595,281  54,116

1979   358,245  59,708   674,581  61,326

1980   359,750  59,958   668,008  60,728

1981   360,381  60,064   801,550  66,796

1982   297,766  59,553   692,455  57,705

1983   330,610  66,122   879,338  73,278

1984   396,784  66,131   764,793  58,830

1985   396,773  66,129   827,795  68,983

1986   472,041  67,434   852,604  71,050

1987   338,500  67,700   769,187  59,168

1988   406,200  67,700   773,190  59,476

1989   406,200  67,700   680,171  61,834

1990   414,349  69,058   905,840  75,487

1991   420,424  70,071   772,358  64,363

1992   420,234  70,039   797,025  66,419

1993   403,842  67,307   746,480  62,207

1994   409,516  68,253   691,637  62,876

1995   410,226  68,371   804,265  67,022

1996   416,425  69,404   741,004  61,750

1997   405,788  67,631   824,701  68,725

1998   409,981  68,330   644,541  58,595

1999   380,786  63,464   711,744  64,704

2000   366,737  61,123   688,495  57,375

2001   387,987  64,665   687,476  57,290

2002   452,498  64,643   872,788  67,138

2003   460,584  65,798   896,753  68,891

2004   422,382  70,397   896,171  74,681

2005   423,510  70,585   831,425  69,285

2006   494,095  70,585   846,690  65,130

2007   423,510  70,585   814,403  67,867

2008   491,186  70,169   834,519  64,194

2009   491,499  70,214   913,813  70,293

2010   494,095  70,585   859,122  66,086

2011   494,095  70,585   880,168  67,705

2012   493,315  70,474   813,426  73,948

2013   469,872  67,125   866,912  66,686

2014   472,584  67,512   762,818  58,678

2015   441,992  63,142   925,382  66,099

2016   487,591  69,656   766,321  58,948

2017   464,357  66,337   847,399  65,185

2018   476,302  68,043   804,804  61,908

2019   458,987  65,557   841,167  64,705

2020  Not open to public due to pandemic

 

The University of Iowa established the “Kinnick Stadium Wall of Honor” prior to the start of the 2013 season.

Ten former Hawkeyes have their name and jersey number displayed on the Paul W. Brechler Press Box.

#1 – Aubrey Devine (1919-21)

Devine won the Big Ten Conference Medal for Excellence in athletics and academics, and was quarterback and captain of Iowa’s 1921 Big Ten championship team. He led the Hawkeyes in rushing, passing, and scoring in 1919 and 1920. He drop-kicked a field goal to beat Notre Dame, 10-7, in 1921, as Iowa earned a share of its first mythical national championship.

#25 – Randy Duncan (1956-58)

Duncan won Big Ten and Iowa MVP honors when he led the Hawkeyes to a Rose Bowl title in 1959. He finished second in the 1958 Heisman Trophy balloting. Duncan was a two-time all-conference pick, earned Walter Camp and Player of the Year honors from three organizations, and was the No. 1 pick in the 1958 NFL draft. Iowa shared the mythical national title in both 1956 and 1958, while also earning the Grantland Rice Award in 1958, symbolic of the national football championship.

#62 – Calvin Jones (1953-55)

Jones was named to 22 All-America teams in his career and in 1955 was named winner of the Outland Trophy, awarded to the nation’s top interior lineman. He was Iowa’s first two-time consensus All-American, and his No. 62 jersey is one of only two numbers retired by the Hawkeyes.

#77 – Alex Karras (1956-57)

Karras was a Rose Bowl champion and a consensus All-American in 1957. He was the first two-time AP All-American in Iowa history and a winner of the Outland Trophy, awarded to the nation’s top interior lineman. Karras was Heisman Trophy runner-up in 1957, and a member of the inaugural class of the Iowa Lettermen’s Club Hall of Fame.

#24 – Nile Kinnick (1937-39)

Kinnick won the only Heisman Trophy in school history when he swept the Heisman, Maxwell and Walter Camp awards in 1939. He was the Big Ten MVP for Iowa’s legendary 1939 Ironmen team. He was a Phi Beta Kappa scholar and senior class president, his No. 24 jersey is one of two retired numbers at Iowa, and in 1972 the Hawkeyes’ stadium was named in his honor.

#1 – Gordon Locke (1920-22)

Locke primarily played fullback during his Hawkeye career, but in 1922 he was a Walter Camp first team All-America quarterback, and he’s listed as a defensive back on Iowa’s all-time football team. He scored 72 points as a senior to set a then-Big Ten record, and was awarded the Big Ten Medal of Honor (1923).

#16 – Chuck Long (1982-85)

Long quarterbacked the Hawkeyes to the 1986 Rose Bowl, the same year he became the first player in NCAA history to pass for more than 10,000 career yards. He finished runner-up in the closest Heisman Trophy contest in the award’s history in 1985, and previously held the NCAA record for consecutive completions with 22 at Indiana (1984). Long was named a first team All-Big Ten performer three times, including 1985 when he was named conference MVP.

#15 – Duke Slater (1918-21)

Fred “Duke” Slater was a seven-time letterman at the University of Iowa, competing in football and track from 1918-21. He was an All-Big Ten tackle for the Hawkeyes from 1919-21, and an All-America track and field athlete from 1920-21. He is a member of Iowa’s all-time team. In 1928, Slater earned his law degree from the University of Iowa, and in 1951 he became the first black player inducted into the inaugural College Football Hall of Fame.

#36 – Larry Station (1982-85)

Station was named a consensus All-American in 1984 and 1985, becoming just the second Hawkeye in program history to earn multiple honors. He is the only player in school history to lead the team in tackles four times, and in 1985 finished his career with the all-time tackles record (492). Station started the final 42 games of his career, earned All-America mention in each of his four seasons, and is a linebacker on Iowa’s all-time football team. He was a finalist for the Lombardi and Butkus awards in 1985, and was a three-time first team All-Big Ten honoree. He is Iowa’s most recent induction into the College Football Hall of Fame.

#99 – Andre Tippett

Tippett was Iowa’s first consensus All-American for Coach Hayden Fry, a two-time first-team All-Big Ten and played for Iowa’s 1981 Rose Bowl squad. He was a team captain in 1981, a defensive end on Iowa’s all-time football team, holds Iowa record for tackles for lost yardage in a season (20 tackles for 153 yards in 1980) and led Big Ten in tackles for loss (20) as a junior. Tippett enjoyed a lengthy NFL career with New England, where he was a five-time All-Pro selection during his 11-year career and was named to the Pro Football Hall of Fame in 2008. He was named to the National Football Foundation College Football Hall of Fame in 2021.